Winter Wonderland

Murphy Henry

Murphy Henry

I thought you might like to see a few pictures of what it’s like up here in what Red calls the “cold and snowy frozen north.”

We’ve basically been house-bound since last Friday, February 5. We did get out for a few hours yesterday, but today the brutal wind and drifting snow has once again kept us indoors.

Snow on the back deck.

Snow on the back deck.

But we’ve been lucky so far—KNOCK ON WOOD BIG TIME—in that we’ve not lost power. We did get a flicker about an hour ago, so I filled up the bathtub with water and laid out candles and matches, just in case.

All my lessons for today canceled so I’m not in a very musical mood. However, I did talk to a fellow on the phone the other day who gave me a great big grin. He was talking about how he didn’t like a lot of the new bluegrass, that he much preferred the old. And while I do like a “right smart” of the new stuff (Old Crowe Medicine Show, Robin and Linda Williams, the Dixie Bee-Liners, Laurie Lewis) I understood where he was coming from. Especially when he said, of the new music, “It don’t make no lump come in your throat.”

Snow sculpture?

Snow sculpture?

And that’s pretty much all I want from music. Which is why I also like George Jones and Conway Twitty.

Hope you’re staying warm!

Crazy snow art.

Crazy snow art.

2 thoughts on “Winter Wonderland

  1. Martha Carlton

    Hey Murphy,

    I love your snow pictures. It’s about like that here in Bethesda. Even babysitting grandchildren doesn’t completely make up for Florida’s nice warm temperatures!!!

  2. Steve (in Japan)

    Those are great looking snow scenes you’ve posted. I have a fantastic view of Mt. Fuji and get to look at snow for 9 months (mid or late Sept. to mid July) of the year. Also, I have another great view of the Tanzawa Mountain Range and see some spectacular snow scenes during the winter months. I’d like to say that I hope you get a few more snow falls like this one before the winter is over so that you can say, “The winter of 2010 was the greatest ‘evah’!,” but I don’t think Red would see it that way. Though, being grounded that much would be a winter for him to remember, wouldn’ it? I agree with the fellow on the other end of your telecon. Some of the music being passed off as bluegrass just isn’t. The intruments are, but the music and words are not. I just turned 66 in late January so you know that I grew up in a different time. A time when you had to warm up a radio to listen to it on Saturday nights. Also, a time when there wasn’t such a distinct line drawn between country music and bluegrass music. I think it’s time to draw another line between what’s traditional bluegrass and what is not or the other “stuff.”

    Steve

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